Making your blinds and curtains “child safe”

This entry was posted on 25th April 2016 nursery safety

If you have children or have children visiting your home, then you will be sure to agree that child safety in your house is paramount. Of all the rooms in your house the ones which should be the safest, nurseries, children’s playrooms and bedrooms should certainly be the top of the list. In these rooms one of the most important areas that contributes to safety are the window coverings in the room, and how they are operated. The removal of potentially dangerous blind cords or curtain ties is often overlooked with tragic repercussions. In fact, since 1999 over 30 children below the age of 5 have died following accidental strangulation with blind cords or curtain pulls. Hundreds more sustained serious injuries, all from this standard household item.

Since 2004, RoSPA (The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents) has called upon the blind industry to take action to reduce the risks presented by blind cords and has been working to raise awareness of the safety issues they present. In February 2014 RoSPA strengthened the child safety elements in a new European standard requiring all new blinds to be “safe by design”. This covers most kinds of window covering including roller blinds, vertical blinds and pleated blinds, but also Roman blinds, panel blinds and shutters.

Unsuitable blinds may not meet safety requirements

Whilst this will undoubtedly make new blinds much safer, many parents and grandparents may still have unsuitable blinds in place that do not meet these safety requirements.

According to RoSPA “most accidental deaths involving blind cords happen in the bedroom and occur in children between 16 months and 36 months old, with the majority (more than half) happening at around 23 months. These toddlers are mobile, but their heads still weigh proportionately more than their bodies compared to adults and their muscular control is not yet fully developed, which makes them more prone to be unable to free themselves if they become entangled.”

What’s more the windpipes of toddlers in these age groups are not fully developed and as such they are more susceptible to suffocation if their neck is constricted.

RoSPA does not recommend cutting blind cords but instead looking for a safe and permanent long term solution that removes the problem and ensures that children do not become exposed to cords.

Electronic blinds a simple solution

Such a simple solution would be to remove the cords entirely by installing remote controlled electric blinds or motorised curtains in all areas that children have access to. These have no dangerous cords, as the mechanism for raising, lowering and tilting the blind are all contained in a secure cartridge.

What’s more these blinds are one of the safest window coverings around, especially if there are likely to be young children in your house.

Electric powered window blinds were once just for the lucky few, but now they are more accessible than ever. The benefits of being able to install a battery or mains powered remote control window blind with no disruption to interior decoration are huge and because no wiring is necessary, effortless DIY installation is virtually the same as a standard blind.

These blinds are available online and are bespoke to you simply measure your existing window space and replace a potentially dangerous corded blind with a safe and effective electric version. It is not only a sure-fire way to improve the look of your room with bespoke blinds, but it may also be a life saver.

For more information on made to measure electronic blinds visit http://controlissblinds.co.uk.

Sources

British Blind and Shutter Association ROSPA

This Post was posted in Blackout Blinds, Child Safety, Roller Blinds and was tagged with blinds, safety