Kirsty Whyte

This entry was posted on 20th June 2011

You may have been lucky enough to purchase a piece of furniture that was designed by Kirsty Whyte, without knowing it. Kirsty Whyte, a British interior and furniture designer, studied Decorative Arts at Nottingham Trent University. Due to her hard work and creativity on that particular course, Kirsty was invited as a guest to Kalmar University in Sweden, where she studied alongside some of the industry’s biggest names. Kirsty’s work has been exhibited all over the world, she was an intern for Tom Dixon and for a while, she has worked for Habitat, Dwell, British Home Stores and Next as a designer. Some of the award winning products Kirsty has produced include The Hound table, a small occasional table that can be stacked and interlocks to create a larger table. Hand crafted in the UK, using wood off-cuts that would otherwise go to waste, the Limpet Hooks are a fun and stylish way to hang your coats and bags.

The Gordo one piece light – named after one of the first monkeys to go into space, due to it's space age appearance – is incredibly stylish and could feature in any room. Kirsty has received a lot of great press about her products and design, in magazines such as Living, Glamour and Elle Decoration. She won Liberty’s Best Newcomer award in 2009 and Most Prolific Hidden Art Member in 2010. What I particularly like about Kirsty’s designs are they are incredibly neat, and logical, bright and fun. She has been inspired by origami and she thinks about the importance of waste and recycling so tries to create pieces that have minimum wastage. She challenges herself with different shapes and style and will produce pieces from one continuous piece of material, for instance her Drew table bases are made from one continuous piece of recycled steel. If you want clever, modern design, Kirsty Whyte is definitely a designer to consider. You can see a full range of Kirsty’s products at www.Kirstywhyte.com.

This Post was posted in Best of British and was tagged with designer, Kirsty Whyte, table