Chromotherapy - The Colour Of Thought

This entry was posted on 14th July 2011

When sunlight hits water drops in the air at an angle that causes light to be reflected within those water drops, the light is separated into the different colours of the visible light spectrum, and the result we see is an enchanting display of these colours in the form of a rainbow. Colour is something we acknowledge from very early on in life and different colours can create varying interior mood effects, which is why the Controliss electric window blinds collection is available in an incredibly wide spectrum of varying colour shades so the perfect room ambience can be achieved. The terms that define the appearance of a colour are Saturation; Hue and Dichromatism; and Brightness, Tint and Shade. The Saturation of a colour refers to it's intensity. For example, adding extra layers of paint when covering walls will increase the paint colour's saturation. Hue is the similarity (or difference) a colour can be described as having to the 'rainbow colours', such as 'dark green', whereas Dichromatism relates to a change of hue shown as the result of a change in depth or thickness of a material. Brightness describes the Tint or Shade of a colour. Tint applies to the lightness of a colour, achieved by adding white to it, while Shade is acquired by adding black to a colour. When the Tint or Shade of a colour is altered, the Hue usually remains the same. For example, pink can be described as a Tinted red, but the adjustment from red to pink does not require a change in the Hue. Chromotherapy is the use of colour to stimulate the mind and can alter your mood and behaviour. Also referred to as colourology or colour therapy, the roots of chromotherapy have been found to lay in ancient Egyptian culture, whilst also having connections to other ancient civilisations. But, unlike some ancient ideology, scientific studies are able to prove that different colours do generate different emotional reactions in individuals, often for the better. Taking that into consideration, it is important that suitable colours are chosen in your home to take advantage of these 'healing properties'. However, a notable finding in the colour psychology studies is that the reactions were not always the same from person to person, so it is advised that anyone who will be spending considerable time in a room is involved in the choosing of the room's colour before it is applied (especially if the choice of colour is particularly exuberant). The world is full of glorious colour, and so should your home be. There are countless ways you can introduce colour therapy into your house, and there are even devices that will gently change colour to create a comforting mood. So, however your day has gone, you should be able to depend on your home to surround you with a soothing and relaxing ambience.

This Post was posted in Colour & Design and was tagged with blinds, Colour & Design, colour therapy, controliss, hue, light, shade, shades