Child Safety

  • Making your blinds and curtains “child safe”

    Posted on 25th April 2016 by admin. nursery safety

    If you have children or have children visiting your home, then you will be sure to agree that child safety in your house is paramount. Of all the rooms in your house the ones which should be the safest, nurseries, children’s playrooms and bedrooms should certainly be the top of the list. In these rooms one of the most important areas that contributes to safety are the window coverings in the room, and how they are operated. The removal of potentially dangerous blind cords or curtain ties is often overlooked with tragic repercussions. In fact, since 1999 over 30 children below the age of 5 have died following accidental strangulation with blind cords or curtain pulls. Hundreds more sustained serious injuries, all from this standard household item.

    Since 2004, RoSPA (The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents) has called upon the blind industry to take action to reduce the risks presented by blind cords and has been working to raise awareness of the safety issues they present. In February 2014 RoSPA strengthened the child safety elements in a new European standard requiring all new blinds to be “safe by design”. This covers most kinds of window covering including roller blinds, vertical blinds and pleated blinds, but also Roman blinds, panel blinds and shutters.

    Unsuitable blinds may not meet safety requirements

    Whilst this will undoubtedly make new blinds much safer, many parents and grandparents may still have unsuitable blinds in place that do not meet these safety requirements.

    According to RoSPA “most accidental deaths involving blind cords happen in the bedroom and occur in children between 16 months and 36 months old, with the majority (more than half) happening at around 23 months. These toddlers are mobile, but their heads still weigh proportionately more than their bodies compared to adults and their muscular control is not yet fully developed, which makes them more prone to be unable to free themselves if they become entangled.”

    What’s more the windpipes of toddlers in these age groups are not fully developed and as such they are more susceptible to suffocation if their neck is constricted.

    RoSPA does not recommend cutting blind cords but instead looking for a safe and permanent long term solution that removes the problem and ensures that children do not become exposed to cords.

    Electronic blinds a simple solution

    Such a simple solution would be to remove the cords entirely by installing remote controlled electric blinds or motorised curtains in all areas that children have access to. These have no dangerous cords, as the mechanism for raising, lowering and tilting the blind are all contained in a secure cartridge.

    What’s more these blinds are one of the safest window coverings around, especially if there are likely to be young children in your house.

    Electric powered window blinds were once just for the lucky few, but now they are more accessible than ever. The benefits of being able to install a battery or mains powered remote control window blind with no disruption to interior decoration are huge and because no wiring is necessary, effortless DIY installation is virtually the same as a standard blind.

    These blinds are available online and are bespoke to you simply measure your existing window space and replace a potentially dangerous corded blind with a safe and effective electric version. It is not only a sure-fire way to improve the look of your room with bespoke blinds, but it may also be a life saver.

    For more information on made to measure electronic blinds visit http://controlissblinds.co.uk.

    Sources

    British Blind and Shutter Association ROSPA

    This Post was posted in Blackout Blinds, Child Safety, Roller Blinds and was tagged with blinds, safety

  • Reducing Infant Hazards At Home

    Posted on 11th November 2011 by Chris.

    The Door Guardian

    Babies and toddlers are notoriously explorative. They like to amble around the house, showing interest in all manner of objects, unaware of what is safe to touch, and what could actually cause them harm. By taking a look around any home, you will inevitably be able to spot areas that could put a child at risk of injury.  The home can be a dangerous place for them to exercise their curiosities, but there are many products on the market that can make it less hazardous to your inquisitive youngsters. The first problems to be on the lookout for are objects that are, even if only partly, within reach of a little one, such as a lamp placed on a side table, a radiator or a window blind with low hanging cords, that could fall or have parts that could do some harm to a child. As a solution for each of these given examples, you can obtain electric cable shorteners that will help keep the cables that are required for appliances out of the way to avoid tripping, electric shock or strangulation and may also prevent them falling off their base. Another precaution is to stop a toddler from burning themselves on a hot radiator by purchasing a radiator cover that will not only act as a barrier between the hot surface and the child, it could improve décor by having something aesthetically better than a normal radiator. The Perfect Playthings Radiator Cover from Safetots is a padded fabric cover for water filled radiators that is available in various colours, while Jali can provide made-to-measure covers and cabinets in a style to suit your tastes. In addition, the installation of Controliss cordless motorised Roller blinds would make your home safer for young children. Our wireless remote control blinds have full remote control operation, giving you, not only exceptionally convenient window blind control; but with no need for draw cords, there are no worries about younger children damaging the blinds or, more importantly, hurting themselves. Accidents also occur when larger pieces of furniture topple over which, needless to say, can cause serious injury. A simple way to avoid this happening is to attach furniture straps to the wall and at each end of the back of your furniture where they can be hidden from view. In their inquisitive nature, toddlers will also try to open many doors, cupboards and cabinets. This can be bothersome as, once they are opening doors, they could wander outside, access cupboards containing dangerous objects like cleaning chemicals or glass, or they could hurt their fingers by shutting the door on them. There are many different locks that would present great difficulty to infants trying to gain entry to certain cupboards, cabinets, draws and even a fridge or oven, but are easy to use by adults. And for larger doors, there are door stoppers that will prevent the door from closing on little fingers and can simply be pushed onto the door edge without the need for screws or adhesive. If you are worried about your child opening the front door and wondering outdoors, The Door Guardian is designed to resist forced entry and so is very capable of stopping a child who cannot reach it from opening the door. For anyone who can reach it, the Door Guardian is merely moved aside to allow the door to open. It is suitable for other external doors too, such as a balcony door. A common piece of baby safety equipment is the baby monitor, however these have moved on from being able to just listen to a child in another room, now mums and dads can watch, as well as hear, their baby on a monitor using a camera that is placed in the baby's room, some of which even include a night vision vision mode. The advancement and design of home child safety products give parents many more options, concerning the protection of their child. The result of this is that there is less need for them to be anxious when the toddlers are roaming around the house; playing, discovering and growing.

    This Post was posted in Child Safety and was tagged with child, cordless, door, home, infant, radiator, Remote Control, roller, safety, toddlers, window blind

  • ROSPA Blinds Cord Campaign Highlighted on BBC Breakfast

    Posted on 1st November 2011 by Chris.

    The BBC's Breakfast show today highlighted the tragic case of toddler Emily Warner. The two year old who was found by her father, unconscious and hanging in blinds cords in her bedroom at the families home in Royston, Hertfordshire. Emily's mother appeared on BBC's Breakfast show with a RoSPA representative and highlighted RoSPA's hugely important 'Blind Cord Safety Campaign' which is calling upon UK window blinds retailers and manufacturers to take the incentive and manufacture, distribute and retail blinds to the general public without the looped cords that can cause harm and sometimes fatal injury to children through accidental strangulation.

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    This Post was posted in Child Safety and was tagged with blind, blinds, campaign, child, cords, rospa, safety

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